Definitions of Sacraments


Baptism

The Sacrament of Baptism is often called “The door of the Church,” because it is the first of the seven sacraments not only in time (since most Catholics receive it as infants) but in priority, since the reception of the other sacraments depends on it. It is the first of the three Sacraments of Initiation, the other two being the Sacrament of Confirmation and the Sacrament of Holy Communion. Once baptized, a person becomes a member of the Church.


Eucharist

The Sacrament of Holy Communion is the third of the Sacraments of Initiation.  The Church urges us to receive Communion frequently (even daily, if possible), it is called a sacrament of initiation because, like Baptism and Confirmation, it brings us into the fullness of our life in Christ.

In Holy Communion, we are eating the True Body and Blood of Jesus Christ, without which “you shall not have life in you” (John 6:53).


Reconciliation

Reconciliation/Confession is one of the least understood of the sacraments of the Catholic Church. In reconciling us to God, it is a great source of grace, and Catholics are encouraged to take advantage of it often. The purpose of Reconciliation is to reconcile man to God. When we sin, we deprive ourselves of God’s grace. And by doing so, we make it even easier to sin some more. The only way out of this downward cycle is to acknowledge our sins, to repent of them, and to ask God’s forgiveness. Then, in the Sacrament of Reconciliation, grace can be restored to our souls, and we can once again resist sin.


Confirmation

Although, in the West, Confirmation is usually received as a teenager, several years after making First Communion, the Catholic Church considers it the second of the three Sacraments of Initiation (Baptism being the first and Communion the third). Confirmation is regarded as the perfection of Baptism, because, as the introduction to the Rite of Confirmation states:

by the sacrament of Confirmation, [the baptized] are more perfectly bound to the Church and are enriched with a special strength of the Holy Spirit. Hence they are, as true witnesses of Christ, more strictly obliged to spread and defend the faith by word and deed.

 Matrimony

Marriage, a lifelong union between a man and a woman for procreation and mutual support, is a natural institution, but it is also one of the seven sacraments of the Catholic Church. As a sacrament, it reflects the union of Jesus Christ and His Church. The Sacrament of Marriage is also known as the Sacrament of Matrimony.


Holy Orders

The Sacrament of Holy Orders is the continuation of Christ’s priesthood, which He bestowed upon His Apostles. There are three levels to this sacrament of ordination: the episcopate, the priesthood, and the diaconate.


Anointing of the Sick/Last Rites

Traditionally referred to as Extreme Unction or Last Rites, the Sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick is administered both to the dying and to those who are gravely ill or are about to undergo a serious operation, for the recovery of their health and for spiritual strength.


RCIA (Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults)

If you are interested in learning more about the Catholic Faith and becoming a Catholic as an adult, please contact the Parish office @ 780-467-5470 or email info@olph.ca
RCIA is a process of conversion and preparation for a life of discipleship and is supported by the 4 pillars of catechesis: teaching, liturgy, service and community.


 

Did you miss the standard age to receive your or your child’s sacraments? For more information on “late” sacraments please follow this link.